Oxfam: “BEHIND THE BRANDS”

by Ben Wollam Everyone prepare for doomsday, it seems like Malthus was right! We live in an era of undependable crop yields and their even more volatile market prices. With one out of every seven people going to bed starving every night, food security is a huge issue. Oxfam at the University of Texas acknowledges…

Is Our Legacy as Important as our Future?

by Hannah Babich I recently read an article in The New York Times discussing a new exhibit entitled “Our Global Kitchen: Food, Nature, Culture” at the American Museum of Natural History (http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/24/arts/design/our-global-kitchen-at-american-museum-of-natural-history.html?pagewanted=1&_r=0&ref=food). The article describes a fantastic display of food cultures around the world, from production to consumption. This grand new exhibit explores a myriad…

An Evening with Michael Pollan

by Genesis Valdes Going to the grocery store can be quite a challenge. You have so many products to choose from and they all  have these claims of less fat, no GMOs, organic, etc. The real question is what should I eat? For food journalist, author, and activist, Michael Pollan, the answer is quite clear: eat real food….

Meet the Local Food Leaders

The idea of “being a Food Leader” can be a bit abstract and confusing. It is definitely different from being a Food Entrepreneur, which is a leader who takes the initiative to create something that does not currently exist in their society. Being a Food Leader is more diverse, it is something everyone can be.

How to prepare a Food Entrepreneur

Reflecting on the success of the Food Studies Project (FSP), I am happy to call ourselves “Food Entrepreneurs”. Less than year ago, I did not have a real understanding of what the word “entrepreneur” meant. Then, at the beginning of the Spring 2012 semester, I caught myself in front of a panel of judges at…

If I Die Far From You: Part I

Mexico, beautiful and beloved,
If I die far from you
let them say I am sleeping
and bring me back to you. 
 This is the rough translation of Mexico Lindo y Querido, one of the most popular and typical songs of Mexico. It represents a common experience of the Mexican people — that of displacement and immigration….

Educated Eater

Dear UT Community, During my undergraduate years at UT, I have completely transformed my relationship with food. I have become an Educated Eater, a student who has been exposed to a diverse understanding of food and eating. I was introduced to many new foods, learned about the real cost of food, studied a little bit…

The Common Agricultural Policy

Food has been traded between regions for thousands of years. The tomato plant, did not originate in Italy as one might expect, but in the Americas. The silk road was formed for the practice of bartering. The American food system, specifically the animal industries, has been heavily scrutinized over the last decade. Contemporary muckrakers such…

Reverence and Love

In December I had the opportunity to attend a talk given by Wendell Berry and Wes Jackson. Though the discussion covered many topics, it was essentially about humanity’s place and influence on the natural world and how our need to control it is doing us more harm than good. Agriculture may be the biggest culprit….

Kitchen Pimpin’ Obesity

The Lonestar State has the highest percentage of overweight adult males at 75.5%, only second to Alabama’s 75.9%. There are plenty of attempts to educate the population on how to eat — nutritional charts and dietary recommendations, for instance — but these are not solutions. The majority of us know that we need to consume…

GMOverdramatic

Its a common axiom among some people interested in food that Genetically Modified Organisms (GMOs) are a bad idea. This sentiment ranges in intensity from those who think organic food is simply more nutritious to people who believe GMOs are destined to destroy the human race. Much like Brittany’s post about local food, I think…

Local Food: Consider the Consequences

Eat local? Eat organic? Eat meat? Eat imported? The food choices that we make can have long-term — and often unintended – consequences. Simply look to the history of agriculture, rife with examples of (occasionally) well-intentioned policy gone bad. Farm subsidies in America, for example, began during the Depression era and were meant to help…